About Shiba Inu Breeders

While some breeders would rather breed big, muscular, and strong dogs, there are those that would rather breed dogs that are small and cute. If you want to breed the latter kind, one of the best choices of dogs to breed is the Shiba Inu. Shiba Inus are Japanese dogs that have looks similar to that of a fox. Shiba Inu breeders usually have to take extra care of their females in order to breed them right. Shiba Inus are also a bit challenging to raise.

As said, the Shiba Inu is small in size. It has a fox-like appearance. This appearance can most probably be attributed to the dog’s ears which are triangular, erect, and pointed. The Shiba Inu also has a round muzzle. It has a tight lip and black nose. The eyes of a Shiba Inu are deep set and triangular in shape. Its tail is thick and curled over at its back. It is double coated which is a combination of both soft and stiff. A Shiba Inu’s color usually ranges from red, red black, tan, cream, and orange red. There should be markings on its cheeks, muzzle sides, throat, chest, and underside.

Even though the size of the dog is compact, Shiba Inu breeders should take note of the dogs aggression and temperament. A Shiba Inu dog is like a compact ball of pure activeness. It is confident, alert, and usually very playful. It is also brave and bold. Shiba Inu breeders need not to worry much because a Shiba Inu is clean. It is also important to socialize this breed when it is still a puppy. This is to ensure that your dog will not shy away from strangers and be aggressive towards others. It is because of their fun-loving, loyal, and kind nature that raising and breeding a Shiba Inu is ideal.

In breeding this type of dog, Shiba inu breeders should take care of them properly. Get them checked regularly by the veterinarian and let them have the necessary shots they need. See if your Shiba Inu dog has physical and behavioral deficiencies. If your dog is fit for breeding, you need to understand your dog’s heat cycle. Wait until it is her second or third heat cycle before breeding. In considering the stud, you should take note of his health conditions as well. It is ideal to let your female mate with a stud that looks and acts like your female. When the parents are done mating, take extra care of your female and always seek the attention of a veterinarian to ensure safety and success. Shiba Inu breeders should always take note of the important considerations for successful breeding.

What Is A Shiba Inu?

Among the dog breeds in the world today, a Shiba Inu that is considered to be of the ancient type of dogs. While this native Japanese canine makes is one of the smallest dogs from the country, it makes for a great pet because of certain traits that it possesses. While dogs can be naturally loyal, Shiba Inus possess devotion to their owners in a way that makes them ideal for family dogs that will always be by your side.

Other qualities of Shiba Inus make them really admirable pets. These are the following traits that make them stand out from the other breeds:

  •          Intelligent
  •          Bold
  •          Active
  •          Good Natured
  •          Dignified
  •          Calm
  •          Beautiful
  •          Loyal
  •          Affectionate
  •          Loving
  •          Delightful
  •          Playful
  •          Strong Agile

These traits make Shiba Inus remarkable dogs and pets. One of their most revered qualities would be a regal bearing, simply because they have been raised in Japan and the Japanese are quite a proud people. This means that training Shiba Inus to follow certain orders can prove to be quite troublesome.  Approaching such a matter in an expert way can lead you to actually training them to become really efficient, and they will become good pets when they end up as adults that will be able to lend to easy training and teaching.

History of the Shiba Inu

Shiba Inus are one of the fourteen ancient breeds of dog, with studies showing that they have been in existence from way back to the 3rd Century BC. These dogs, because they are strong and agile, were greatly utilized by the Japanese when it came to hunting, making them one of the best canine candidates when it came to hunting and flushing small games.

Their existence dwindled though during World War II though, when bombing raids as well as post war distemper came all across Japan. A few dogs of this breed have managed to survive, which is why the remaining dogs of this breed were taken from three remaining bloodlines of Shiba Inus. While the mixture of these dog’s lineages has actually led to a number of Shiba Inu dogs in the world today, the study of Japanese dogs in the mid-20th century allowed for a rise in the formalization and classification of this dog breed in to one type. This resulted in the Shiba Inus that are made for pets today, and the animal has been recognized as one of the dogs that are being preserved by the Nippo (Nihon Ken Hozonkai), which is the Association for the Preservation of the Japanese Dog.

Raising a Shiba Inu

Shiba Inus can be great pets for any household, and having one for the home will certainly please families. Because of their loyalty, families are sure to find a new member that will be devoted to them for the rest of its life.

While such loyalty can be quite touching, people should exercise great care when it comes to raising Shiba Inus. It is important to socialize Shiba Inus at an early age, mainly because they can end up being unfamiliar with people and exposure to such can cause them to get excited and react unexpectedly.

Shiba Inus might be the smallest dogs of the other six breeds from Japan, but they are big enough that they can cause potential harm to children when they have not been properly socialized to mingle with them. That’s why it’s important to make sure that you are able to expose them to children as well as a great number of people, so your Shiba Inu will end up domesticated and fun to be with.

Guide To Shiba Inu Puppies

Shiba Inu puppies melted the hearts of many people when a viral video of a Shiba Inu (Mari) and her three puppies was spread across the internet. They became famous for saving an old man and his granddaughter under the planks of wood from their collapsed house because of the 2004 Niigata earthquake.

The Shiba is considered the smallest of all Japanese dog breeds. Yet, despite its size, the Shiba Inu is known for its excellent hunting skills. Believe it or not, the small and brushwood dog was built for hunting bears and boars. The breed almost went obsolete when the World War II occurred but some breeders were able to rescue the Shiba. Today, it is one of the most popular household breeds in Japan. Its versatility is impeccable. This breed wears many hats ranging from being a watchdog, guard dog, show dog, companion dog, hunting dog, etc.

The most prominent feature of Shiba Inu puppies is the fluffy and straight coat. The Shiba Inu actually has two coats. The undercoat is soft and thick while the outer coat is stiff and straight. You will see Shiba Inus in several coat colors black with tan markings, sesame with red markings, cream, red, or red with hints of black. Shiba Inus definitely have markings on their cheeks, muzzles, throat, chest, and underside. Their muzzles are round and narrow toward the nose, their lips tight, triangle ears erect, and their eyes triangular. Their tails are very distinct because they curl over the back. Their body structure is very compact.

The earthquake video may have portrayed the Shiba Inu as compassionate, courageous, and loyal. While these characteristics are true, it takes a good deal of training to mold Shiba Inu puppies. This breed is known for its strong and alpha personality. Needless to say, you should expect the Shiba to be stubborn. In fact, this breed is not recommended for first-time dog owners because improper handling may cause the Shiba to be domineering and destructive. It’s important to train Shiba Inu puppies firmly and as soon as possible. Establish that the human is the leader in the master-dog relationship. Shibas are very loyal dogs so expect them to be a little reserved with strangers. Towards an effective master, this breed is very loving, courageous, kind, playful, and alert. If you decide to keep a Shiba Inu, only keep one breed in the house because Shibas tend to rule over other dogs. Don’t mix them with small animals because the hunter in them will only be harmful to the smaller pets.

You can keep Shiba Inu puppies in apartments as long as they get moderate exercise regularly. Be wary of hip dysplasia and patellar luxation with this breed. Shiba Inus are social dogs so maintain a health and loving relationship with your puppies. While they are not hyperactive dogs, Shiba Inus certainly appreciate physical activity. They’re remarkably smart so keep their minds alert with training and activities. Start obedience training as early as 4 months. Shibas tend to become destructive when they’re bored.

All About Shiba Inus

Shiba inus are the smallest of the six native breeds of Japan. Smart, alert, independent, affectionate, playful, brave, neat, confident, and speedy are only some of the adjectives that can be used to describe these dogs. The Japanese have described the breed using three words: soboku (alertness), ryosei (good nature), and kaani-i (spirited boldness), traits that best exemplify the oldest breed in Japan. Somewhat resembling foxes with their russet coat and bushy tails, Shiba inus are the perfect companions for those who have active lifestyles, being highly energetic themselves.  

Our 4 Paw Rating – to the suitability of shiba inus for your home and lifestyle:

Size

Shiba inus reach between 13 and 17 inches at shoulder height and weigh between 17 and 32 lbs.

Coat Care

Shiba inus have a stiff outer coat and a thick, soft undercoat. They shed heavily twice a year, but also shed on a regular basis. Brushing their coat daily can help maintain their coat, or at least after every few days.

Family Life

Shiba inus are good with children and can also serve as good guard dogs, as they have a very protective personality.

When it comes to personalities, some owners may find that their shiba inu has a tendency to act more like felines more than canines, ignoring you for long periods of time. However, they can also be quite affectionate and loving.

Lifestyle

Shiba inus are quite flexible and can adapt to a variety of households, whether in the city or in the country. However, owners will need to be aware of the fact that the breed has a tendency toward possessiveness. Sharing is not natural to them, which is why it’s a good idea to put away their favorite toys and treats when around children or other dogs to avoid trouble.

Because of their active personalities, shiba inus require a lot of room to play in, such as a fenced yard. As such, small apartments aren’t ideal for the breed. It’s important for owners to spend time with them, which is why shiba inus aren’t recommended for frequent travelers.

Health

The average lifespan of shiba inus is between 12 and 17 years. Like other dogs, the breed is prone to contracting diseases, including but not limited to allergies (food or otherwise), glaucoma, hip dysplasia, epilepsy, hypothyroidism, and cancer.

While not strictly diseases, shiba inus are also known for running all over the house without a reason and chasing after their tails.

Exercise

As already mentioned, shiba inus are an active breed, which is why they need a lot of exercise. A daily workout is best so they can work off their energy. You can take him or her with you jogging or walking in the neighborhood. Make sure your dog is leashed though, because he or she can be aggressive toward other dogs and smaller animals, such as squirrels.

Training

While shiba inus may be smart, the breed is notoriously difficult to train because of their independent and stubborn personalities. As such, it might be a better idea to hire a trainer to work with your dog instead of trying to do so yourself, since trainers have more experience in dealing with the breed. Shiba inus will also need to be socialized early so that their aggressive tendencies will be reined in.

Basic Shiba Inu Care

Despite their size, Shiba Inus are still considered the smallest of all Japanese dog breeds. They look very much like red foxes with their pointed faces and upright ears, but their personality closely resembles that of a cat. They are fastidious with their appearance and they always want to keep clean. Hailed as the most popular dog breed in Japan, Shiba Inus are extremely intelligent but that doesn’t make them easy to train. Shibas Inus are very independent dogs. That, coupled with intelligence, makes this dog one of the hardest canine breeds to train. Though training is a challenge, it is worth it. Shibas are loyal to their family, good with kids, and affectionate to their owners. Shibas have a very unique temperament. If you’re planning to adopt one, you need to know everything you can about Shiba Inu care.

Shiba Inu Care Tip #1: Leash Training

Shiba Inus must be leash trained as early as possible. Shiba Inus are specifically bred to hunt down small rodents, and if they are not leash trained early, it can be very difficult to stop them once they start running after small animals. Leash training a Shiba Inu at an older age can be very difficult because Shibas are strong creatures. They can easily pull the leash away from your hand or hurt you.

Tip #2: Activities

Intelligent dogs get bored easily and tend to become destructive when not mentally stimulated. Shiba Inus require lots of physical and mental stimulation. Give your Shiba some toys when you’re not around, but don’t forget provide him with lots of physical affection as well. Shiba Inus love to run and play, very much like people. Be sure to give them a toy they can chew on, lest they chew on your furniture. When allowing your Shibas to play in the backyard, make sure you have a six-foot fence surround it because Shibas can jump very high while others were even reported to climb.

Tip #3: Socializing

Shiba Inus must be socialized at a young age. Since Shibas are bred to be hunting dogs, they tend to become very rowdy around children of not trained. Surround your Shiba with lots of people at an early age. Keep a close eye on your Shiba when around strangers for the first time, most especially children who are young. This rule also applies to other pets your Shiba doesn’t know. Shiba Inus learn very quickly but can be quite of a challenge when it comes to obedience.

Tip #4: Grooming

Shiba Inus are very fastidious about the way they look and will take all chances to keep clean. In addition, their coat is tend to be self-cleaning, as it repels dirt. Shiba Inus don’t require much grooming care, but they must be bathed at least once every week. Shibas require some combing to keep their fur shiny and soft. Brushing the hair of your Shiba on a regular basis will prevent hair from floating around your house.

More Shiba Inu Training For Puppies

One of the world’s oldest dog breeds would be the Shiba Inu, so those who look forward to raising these dogs will find that Shiba Inu training can prove to be quite troublesome. Because training of dogs should always be approached when they are at a younger stage, it is best that you start with working on Shiba Inu training while they are puppies.

This will ensure that you will be able to handle them more efficiently as compared to when they are already adults, which will make it troublesome for you to help them work on their training as you will have trouble when it comes to their stubbornness as well as their elusiveness.

Shiba Inu Training for Puppies

One of the things that you have to look into when it comes to Shiba Inu training is to efficiently work on getting them to obey you at such an early age. One of the things that you will notice about Shiba Inus is the fact that they are very much self-assured, which can be attributed to their Japanese origins. Teaching Shiba Inus commands can be quite hard, but you have to try and make them obey as puppies so as to help them carry it over when they become adults.

As puppies, it would be easier to start by socializing Shiba Inus. While they may be loyal and devoted to their owners, they make for a difficult dog when they are not accustomed to meeting other people, particularly children. To ensure that your Shiba Inu will not work to going off on tackling or chasing off strangers when they turn into adults, you should start with familiarizing them with people as puppies.

Another thing you have to work on is to let your Shiba Inu know that leashes are not to be feared. Shiba Inus would very much be displeased when they are leashed, but behavioral training at a young age for them to accept such will make it easier for you to place such a leash around its neck.

What you have to remember is the fact that Shiba Inus make for a loyal yet mischievous pet, and will be doing a lot of silly things when he believes that you are not looking. Be firm about your displeasure of such, and make sure you do not leave them unleashed in public especially in areas that are not securely fenced.

Crate training should be enforced as well at a young age for Shiba Inus, and you must always remember that you should impose a strong sense of leadership towards them. These dogs can be quite dominant as they have playful yet powerful personalities, and will work to pushing you over when they see an opportunity to do so. Shiba Inu training should have you assert your position as your dog’s master, and once you have been able to do so you will find that it is easier for you to teach them commands that will make them more fun and manageable to be with.

Adopting A Shiba Inu Rescue

A Shiba Inu rescue center is built to care for abandoned Shiba Inus and build a list of possible owners and future homes for these dogs. Aside from that, the rescue center provides for the basic needs like neutering, spaying, and shots before they are turned over to the future – and hopefully, permanent – owner. Most of these centers are run by non-profit organizations. They mostly rely on donations to help with the upkeep of the center and pay for the expenses of the dogs needs. Rescue centers also need volunteers too. Support in cash is very much appreciated but help in kind is very much welcome as well.

It is the duty of the Shiba Inu rescue center to educate future owners about the history and background of the breed. Shiba Inus are one of the oldest Japanese native breeds. They have been breed for hunting game and wild animals but they have evolved into guard dogs, watch dogs, and even companion dogs. They’re very versatile animals with a complex yet courageous temperament. It’s quite a pity that there is a growing number of abandoned and neglected Shiba Inus in the community.

If you are interested in adopting from a Shiba Inu rescue center, you should be ready to welcome this kind of dog into your life. Although they look cute and cuddly, the Shiba is not the best breed for first-time dog owners. This is probably the reason many people have abandoned their Shiba Inus. They cannot handle the temperament of the dog. While it is not violent in nature, Shiba Inus have a very strong personality. They will step up and lead the pack every chance they get. They need an owner with a strong personality. The owner has to assert confidence and authority to show the Shiba who’s in charge. This does not mean hurting the dog. Remember, aggression begets aggression when dealing with a Shiba Inu. In some instances, the Shiba Inu becomes so reserved and does not respond to interaction.

Expect that the Shiba Inu receives the basic immunization set and spaying/neutering when it comes from a Shiba Inu rescue center. You may be apprehensive about adopting a Shiba Inu that’s not a puppy anymore but the wonderful thing about adopting from an adoption center is that the Shiba gets holistic care. They receive ample food and kept in comfortable shelters. They are socialized well and some even receive basic obedience training. They will not release dogs for adoption unless they are fully rehabilitated from trauma and stress.

Shiba Inu Dog Training

There are many ways to conduct a Shiba Inu training. In spite of this, Shiba Inu dog training all starts with the puppy stage. As a rule, and it applies to almost most canine breeds, dogs are easier to train during their infancy stage. Making Shiba Inus follow even the simplest command would be a lot harder when they reach maturity. As a consequence, Shiba Inu dogs that have been trained during the latter stages of their development tend to be more disobedient and harder to train.

The best period to begin training your dog is when it reached three months of age or after it had its first vaccine shots. Basically, it is advisable to begin with basic actions and commands.  The success of these basic commands relies on simple association. One of the simplest methods is name association. Remember to always mention the name of your dog first before every command. This will help your dog recognize whether you are directing your attention to it or not. Keep this in mind that stating the name of your pet is the key in the success of basic Shiba Inu training. Failing to do this will result to slower command response.

Compared to other canine breeds, Shiba Inus are very intelligent. They have this inherent capability of catching directions and commands faster than any dog breed. Repetition also plays an important part in making this particular dog breed learn commands faster. The more you practice giving commands, the better the results of the training will be.

Japanese dog breeders find it easier to train Shiba Inu dogs because they have the privilege to come into contact with this breed first. As a result, Shiba Inu that were bred in the soils of Japan are quicker in following complicated commands. Some dogs are even known to hunt fish and game fowls with finesse. However, it takes a great deal of patience to train Shiba Inu dogs and make them great hunters.

One of the most effective techniques in Shiba Inu dog training is the command-act-reward methods. This technique involves repetition and patience. You need to make the dog react to your command. If your pet responds properly, make sure that it gets a reward. Most dogs require food as a reward for every correct action but not Shiba Inus. A mere pat on the head or a brief belly rub is enough to compensate them with their actions. In essence, the Shiba Inu dog training can be very easy as long as you have the patience proper methodology.