Guide To Shiba Inu Puppies

Shiba Inu puppies melted the hearts of many people when a viral video of a Shiba Inu (Mari) and her three puppies was spread across the internet. They became famous for saving an old man and his granddaughter under the planks of wood from their collapsed house because of the 2004 Niigata earthquake.

The Shiba is considered the smallest of all Japanese dog breeds. Yet, despite its size, the Shiba Inu is known for its excellent hunting skills. Believe it or not, the small and brushwood dog was built for hunting bears and boars. The breed almost went obsolete when the World War II occurred but some breeders were able to rescue the Shiba. Today, it is one of the most popular household breeds in Japan. Its versatility is impeccable. This breed wears many hats ranging from being a watchdog, guard dog, show dog, companion dog, hunting dog, etc.

The most prominent feature of Shiba Inu puppies is the fluffy and straight coat. The Shiba Inu actually has two coats. The undercoat is soft and thick while the outer coat is stiff and straight. You will see Shiba Inus in several coat colors black with tan markings, sesame with red markings, cream, red, or red with hints of black. Shiba Inus definitely have markings on their cheeks, muzzles, throat, chest, and underside. Their muzzles are round and narrow toward the nose, their lips tight, triangle ears erect, and their eyes triangular. Their tails are very distinct because they curl over the back. Their body structure is very compact.

The earthquake video may have portrayed the Shiba Inu as compassionate, courageous, and loyal. While these characteristics are true, it takes a good deal of training to mold Shiba Inu puppies. This breed is known for its strong and alpha personality. Needless to say, you should expect the Shiba to be stubborn. In fact, this breed is not recommended for first-time dog owners because improper handling may cause the Shiba to be domineering and destructive. It’s important to train Shiba Inu puppies firmly and as soon as possible. Establish that the human is the leader in the master-dog relationship. Shibas are very loyal dogs so expect them to be a little reserved with strangers. Towards an effective master, this breed is very loving, courageous, kind, playful, and alert. If you decide to keep a Shiba Inu, only keep one breed in the house because Shibas tend to rule over other dogs. Don’t mix them with small animals because the hunter in them will only be harmful to the smaller pets.

You can keep Shiba Inu puppies in apartments as long as they get moderate exercise regularly. Be wary of hip dysplasia and patellar luxation with this breed. Shiba Inus are social dogs so maintain a health and loving relationship with your puppies. While they are not hyperactive dogs, Shiba Inus certainly appreciate physical activity. They’re remarkably smart so keep their minds alert with training and activities. Start obedience training as early as 4 months. Shibas tend to become destructive when they’re bored.

Basic Shiba Inu Care

Despite their size, Shiba Inus are still considered the smallest of all Japanese dog breeds. They look very much like red foxes with their pointed faces and upright ears, but their personality closely resembles that of a cat. They are fastidious with their appearance and they always want to keep clean. Hailed as the most popular dog breed in Japan, Shiba Inus are extremely intelligent but that doesn’t make them easy to train. Shibas Inus are very independent dogs. That, coupled with intelligence, makes this dog one of the hardest canine breeds to train. Though training is a challenge, it is worth it. Shibas are loyal to their family, good with kids, and affectionate to their owners. Shibas have a very unique temperament. If you’re planning to adopt one, you need to know everything you can about Shiba Inu care.

Shiba Inu Care Tip #1: Leash Training

Shiba Inus must be leash trained as early as possible. Shiba Inus are specifically bred to hunt down small rodents, and if they are not leash trained early, it can be very difficult to stop them once they start running after small animals. Leash training a Shiba Inu at an older age can be very difficult because Shibas are strong creatures. They can easily pull the leash away from your hand or hurt you.

Tip #2: Activities

Intelligent dogs get bored easily and tend to become destructive when not mentally stimulated. Shiba Inus require lots of physical and mental stimulation. Give your Shiba some toys when you’re not around, but don’t forget provide him with lots of physical affection as well. Shiba Inus love to run and play, very much like people. Be sure to give them a toy they can chew on, lest they chew on your furniture. When allowing your Shibas to play in the backyard, make sure you have a six-foot fence surround it because Shibas can jump very high while others were even reported to climb.

Tip #3: Socializing

Shiba Inus must be socialized at a young age. Since Shibas are bred to be hunting dogs, they tend to become very rowdy around children of not trained. Surround your Shiba with lots of people at an early age. Keep a close eye on your Shiba when around strangers for the first time, most especially children who are young. This rule also applies to other pets your Shiba doesn’t know. Shiba Inus learn very quickly but can be quite of a challenge when it comes to obedience.

Tip #4: Grooming

Shiba Inus are very fastidious about the way they look and will take all chances to keep clean. In addition, their coat is tend to be self-cleaning, as it repels dirt. Shiba Inus don’t require much grooming care, but they must be bathed at least once every week. Shibas require some combing to keep their fur shiny and soft. Brushing the hair of your Shiba on a regular basis will prevent hair from floating around your house.